115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

Young Adult Literature

Session Chair: 
Kate Carnell Watt, University of California, Riverside
Time: 
Session 4: Friday 3 – 4:30 pm
Location: 
Henry 107

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Kristin Noone, Irvine Valley College
    While Pratchett’s novel invites questions regarding genre and what readers expect to see, Dodger also explores social expectations and their potential for both confinement and clever manipulation regarding how characters are seen, allow themselves to be seen, or carefully stage scenes for others to see; the novel also links city and character, as the London fog becomes not simply a metaphor for Victorian sensation and concealment but a tool for crafting one’s visibility to others.
  2. Taylor D. McCabe, University of California, Irvine
    This paper explores the relationship between literacy and the narrativization of violence in The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly as a means of managing the aftermath of trauma. The novel emphasizes the significance of narrative control over personal histories of trauma; I wish to explore this emphasis as it relates to the generic function of YA literature and its concern with the importance of the interior lives of girls. 
  3. Caryn Lesuma, University of Hawai'i, Manoa
    This paper examines constructions of adolescence/ts in Matthew Kaopio's novels Written in the Sky and Up Among the Stars in order to show how reading Oceanic texts as young adult literature can counteract stereotypes about Indigenous youth in the region while providing models for young readers to negotiate power structures. 
  4. Laura Poladian, Loyola Marymount University
    While YA literature is generally understood to foster empathy, this paper more specifically investigates how narrative strategies and cognitive experience make that process visible. I argue that by linking the rhetoric of motion with emotion, Pam Muñoz Ryan’s Esperanza Rising contributes to the genre as a site for constructing empathetic social reader-actors, especially related to experiences of class.
Session Cancelled: 
No