115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

Voice Studies

Session Chair: 
Katherine Kinney, University of California, Riverside
Time: 
Session 8: Saturday 3:05 – 4:35 pm
Location: 
Henry 225
Topic Area: 

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Andrea Stark Bishop, University of Memphis
    When we discuss the products of collaborative writers, we stumble over this troublesome voice metaphor, a metaphor resting upon the solitary writer projecting a single voice. This project explores the voice within collaborative writing and proposes fusion voicing as terminology worthy of discussing the texture and complexity of collaborative voice.
  2. Angela Ridinger-Dotterman, Queensborough Community College
    Though the 2016 Presidential race arguably elicited more of--and more intense--sex-specific ttacks aimed at Hillary Clinton's public presence, taken together, her public speeches created something new:  a model for female public speech.  Clinton's use of emotion and affect, her invocation of her sex as a source of unique expertise, and even her fashion choices formed a prototype for a female Presidential speech.  This paper contextualizes Clinton's public speeches within the long history of American women's public speech.
  3. Carole-Anne Tyler, "University of California, Riverside"
    Spivak opens “Can the Subaltern Speak?” with a critique of Foucault and Deleuze, whose affirmative answer to her question is grounded in humanist ideas about demands, desires, and self-interest.  Her turn to Freud to theorize the desire to speak for the sati sustains her essay’s question as such and complicates their model of subjectivity and representation. 
  4. Carolyn Schutten, University of California, Riverside
    Emerging from beyond the U.S.-Mexico border fence, a single voice breaks silence and utters the names of 2,487 migrants who perished while endeavoring to traverse the United States-Mexico border. Luz María Sánchez, in her sound piece 2487, reanimates those who died, by naming them. Sánchez summons the voices of the dead and memorializes them, not through the wail of mourning but with measured silences, producing a darker kind of sonic seeking, as the listener waits for next name to be called. 
Session Cancelled: 
No