115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

Film and Literature I

Session Chair: 
James R. Aubrey, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Time: 
Session 1: Friday 8:15 – 9:45 am
Location: 
Henry 227
Topic Area: 

Presenters/Papers:

  1. John Nelson, United States Military Academy, West Point
    This paper will examine the complexities of adapting the contemporary military memoir to film.  I will focus on memoirs from the Vietnam War to the present, primarily Ron Kovic’s Born on the Fourth of July (the Vietnam War), Anthony Swofford’s Jarhead (the First Gulf War), and Chris Kyle’s American Sniper (the Iraq War), along with their respective screen adaptations.
  2. Joi Carr, Pepperdine University
     What does John Singleton and Boyz N the Hood have to do with Ellison’s luminous opus, Invisible Man, or Melvin Van Peebles revolutionary film, Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song?  Singleton’s self-aware narrative explicates an invisible man. This interdisciplinary approach provides an in-depth critical perspective of Boyz, as the embodiment of the blues—how it intimates a world beyond the symbolic world Singleton posits.
  3. Pamela Trayser, Arizona State University
    This essay examines allusions and the application of literary theory within the television series Lost as a means of strengthening character and plot. Lost first makes allusions to historical figures through character names and attributes, as well as attaching literary theories to specific characters. During its six season run, the show strengthens both storyline and plot by presenting literary allusions (in the form of books that characters read or refer to), using these allusions as the theme for specific episodes.
  4. Julie Guerrero, California State University, Los Angeles
    In his 2012 film, Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino appropriates the slave narrative by rewriting the typical history of the black slave and allowing his protagonist, Django Freeman, to secure the power of free and uninterrupted physical mobility within Antebellum Southern societies. 
Session Cancelled: 
No