113th Annual Conference - Portland, Oregon
Friday, November 6 - Sunday, November 8, 2015

British Literature and Culture: 20th and 21st Century II: Materiality of Modernism

Session Chair: 
David Paddy, Whittier College
Time: 
Session 11: Sunday 10:20-11:50am
Location: 
Skyline I (PH-ET)

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Martin McKinsey, University of New Hampshire
    This paper will examine the visual qualities of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, in particular its expressive use of foreign languages, and argue that even in, or perhaps because of, their potential opacity as alien linguistic code, these passages convey a visual meaning with thematic significance for the poem.
  2. Brandon White, University of California at Berkeley
    This paper examines changes to the construction of character in D.H. Lawrence’s Women in Love occasioned by concurrent changes to British libel law. In this new legal reality, descriptions that placed a character within a plaintiff’s social circle became dangerous. Lawrence’s revisions thus attempted to excise any referential definition from the novel that could define his characters against a social background. This strategy not only allowed the novel to escape censure, but also created many of the formal techniques owed to later modernist fiction.
  3. Raymond Babbie, University of Washington
    This paper demonstrates that Dora Marsden developed a negative philosophy through her engagement with the serial nature of her journals, The New Freewoman and The Egoist. Individualist, anti-suffragist, materialist, and self-consciously in process, Marsden’s semiotically-sophisticated philosophy guided her editorship. This in turn led her journals to become potent incubators for modernist literature. 
  4. Emily Schuck, Claremont Graduate University
    The purpose of this paper is to explore and expand a reading of “yes” in Ulysses through anagrams and by identifying a formal structure of an “infinite yes” in the text. The paper then goes on to explore the theoretical implications of infinity in a text and in Ulysses specifically. 
Session Cancelled: 
No