CFP: New Temporal Regimes in Literature, History, and the Social Sciences

CALL FOR PAPERS

First Congress of LALISA: Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies Association of the Pacific Northwest

 New Temporal Regimes in Literature, History, and the Social Sciences

 April  8 & 9, 2016 / Reed College / Portland, Oregon

REGISTER FOR THE CONGRESS AND SUBMIT INDIVIDUAL PAPERS AND PANELS, BY JANUARY 18, 2016 AT WWW.REED.EDU/LALISA

In a time in which apocalyptic discourses inform academic disciplines relating to art and culture, it is pertinent to in- terrogate the conceptions of temporality that lie at their core. As has been widely recognized, above all since the work of François Hartog, for several decades we have confronted an excessive “presentism” that poses new theoretical challeng- es for history, memory, experience, and commemoration. There is thus an urgent need within the social sciences, phi- losophy, and literature to define new temporal regimes that allow for an understanding of the present, eschewing both nostalgia for lost categories and the loss of historical experience and perspective. From these parameters, the conference aspires to offer a space to reflect on topics such as tradition and identity construction, testimonial literature, visual culture, discourses on memory, and translation. The larger goal is to formulate an aesthetic, social, and political criticism of time.

We welcome papers and panels related to any aspect of this area of inquiry. Beyond this overarching theme, we also welcome papers and panels on other topics of interest to our fields of study. Papers can be read in Spanish or English and should not exceed a reading time of 20 minutes.

It is the nature of LALISA to promote intellectual dialogue while emphasizing the importance of collaboration among colleagues, as well as between professors and students. We encourage you to submit panels and invite your students to participate in this event.

 Keynote Speakers

Julia Bryan-Wilson, Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, UC Berkeley

“Marking Time, Unmaking Memory”

 

Ana Maria Ochoa, Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia University

“The Indigenous Musical Archive: Between the Time of Myth and Audiovisual Time”

 

Julio Premat, Professor of Latin American literature at the University of Paris and Director

of the LIRICO research center on literatures of the Río de la Plata countries and its journal, Cuadernos LIRICO

“Repetición, originalidad, tradición: ¿cuál es el tiempo de la literatura actual?”

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CONGRESS: WWW.REED.EDU Iii    LALISALEARN MORE ABOUT LALISA AND JOIN THE ASSOCIATION:

REGISTRATION: FACULTY $30; GRADUATE STUDENTS $15; UNDERGRADUATES, FREE

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