112th Annual Conference - Riverside Convention Center, California
Friday, October 31 - Sunday, November 2, 2014

This page is about the 2014 conference. For 2015 conference info, go to PAMLA 2015.

Medieval Literature I

Session Chair: 
David Marshall, California State University, San Bernardino
Time: 
Session 1: Friday 9:00-10:30am
Location: 
RCC Raincross E
Topic Area: 

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Arpi Movsesian, University of California, Santa Barbara
    The paper explores Laud Misc. 108, and analyzes some of the saints’ lives (in the South English Legendary) and Havelok the Dane and King Horn, to show that the manuscript is not the result of mere haphazardness, but that its works enrich the idea of emerging English identity.  
  2. Shay Hopkins, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Havelock presents its hero in ways that mirror the way in which local, regional English-king saints of the 12th and 13th century were depicted. I suggest that this romance figure functions in similar ways to their saintly counterparts: they facilitate the formation of provincial community identity.  
  3. Omar Hussein, California State University, Long Beach
    This paper investigates the interconnections between antimercantilism and anti-Semitic/anti-Judaic tropes in late Middle English literature, using The Northern Passion from Bodleian Library MS Ashmole 61 as the primary text. Peter Ladd’s work on antimercantilism along with Robert Chazan’s studies of Medieval anti-Semitism are used to help resolve some apparent theological contradictions in the poem.
  4. Ricardo Matthews, University of California, Irvine
    I explore la dame’s pointed response to amant’s attempts to seduce her as a literary alternative, spoken plainly, and free “of eloquence, of meter, of colours.”  The dame’s “nay” is not necessarily against love but against a language which is incapable of giving voice to truth or worse designed to be untruthful.  I will describe a conflict where a desperate poetry runs aground in the face of la dame’s refusal to accept poetry’s claims that words can reveal in “opyn evidence” the truth of love.
Session Cancelled: 
No